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Artists at Lake Hotel

'Inspired by Yellowstone' Artist Series at Lake Hotel

The ‘Grand Lady of the Lake’ inspires artists with her calming setting on Yellowstone Lake. The ‘Inspired by Yellowstone’ artist series at the Lake Hotel this summer features a fine array of artists from photographers to authors to painters.  Stop by the Lake Hotel Gift Shop to learn more about these incredible artists, their inspirations, and their love for Yellowstone.

John Banovich is a world-renowned artist and one of the foremost conservationists of our era. Creating award-winning oil paintings for over two decades his world is exhibited in museums and noteworthy collections across the globe. His deep passion, unwavering commitment, and knowledge of wildlife continue to inspire.

My inspirations…

The strength and vitality of Yellowstone’s wild character is unique and valuable. It gives hope to everyone who experiences its beauty. The natural infinitely changing wonders captivated me as a little kid on family vacations and inspired me to move here in 1978. I am more intrigued and drawn to this place every passing year.

I hope to open people’s senses through my work and help them to recognize the beauty and value of clean healthy landscapes and dynamic wildlife stories.

I want people to experience the same sense of humility and wonder in the presence of life and vitality that I had while making my photographs. By recognizing the value of Yellowstone, I hope my photographs encourage others to tell their own stories, help inspire reverence, and encourage them to help to preserve the place.

My inspirations…

Fifteen years ago I visited YNP for the first time, and that initial experience has brought me back every summer since. The interaction with bear, bison and wolves, the majestic terrain, the untold hours spent hiking every conceivable trail have all inspired me like nothing else in my life.

Every Yellowstone painting I have produced (easily in the hundreds) was inspired by some “once-in-a-lifetime” view or animal encounter while out hiking and experiencing the park first hand. I have always relished then sharing these moments with the park visitors through conversation initiated (oftentimes by them) while viewing my efforts to capture it all on canvas.

Three things I would hope people take away from my works upon viewing are a greater appreciation of just how miraculous Yellowstone is (like no other place on Earth) and a determination to ensure that it is preserved, unchanged; a greater appreciation of art in general and how it communes with one’s inner self; and an understanding that works on canvas must, first and foremost, be judged by the degree to which they “speak” to you, not by how accurately — or photographically — it replicates what only nature can do perfectly.

Her inspirations…

Jamie Anne Blake loves to paint and enjoys writing. She has most recently published a children’s book entitled, “The Adventures of Buffalo Joe and the Blackbird with the Broken Wing.” Her husband gave her the idea for the book, which is set in Grand Teton National Park—one of their favorite places. 

 Watercolor painting has always been Jamie’s preferred medium– she loves the fluidity and looseness of it! Although since studying illustration, she equally loves digitally painting on Photoshop, which can still give a desired watercolor affect. Put a paintbrush or a Wacom tablet pen in her  hand and she’s one happy girl.

 

Jamie’s current project is working on her second Buffalo Joe book– a dream come true! Although, she is always accepting commissions and looks forward to many more artistic endeavors. 

My inspirations…

Fifteen years ago I visited YNP for the first time, and that initial experience has brought me back every summer since. The interaction with bear, bison and wolves, the majestic terrain, the untold hours spent hiking every conceivable trail have all inspired me like nothing else in my life.

Every Yellowstone painting I have produced (easily in the hundreds) was inspired by some “once-in-a-lifetime” view or animal encounter while out hiking and experiencing the park first hand. I have always relished then sharing these moments with the park visitors through conversation initiated (oftentimes by them) while viewing my efforts to capture it all on canvas.

Three things I would hope people take away from my works upon viewing are a greater appreciation of just how miraculous Yellowstone is (like no other place on Earth) and a determination to ensure that it is preserved, unchanged; a greater appreciation of art in general and how it communes with one’s inner self; and an understanding that works on canvas must, first and foremost, be judged by the degree to which they “speak” to you, not by how accurately — or photographically — it replicates what only nature can do perfectly.

Her inspirations…

I came to Yellowstone to heal. My fiancé had died in a head-on car accident, and I was devastated. Plus my career as a journalist had fizzled out as internet technology improved. Moving to Yellowstone better opened my eyes to nature, and to the multiple cultures of people in the world. The park invites you to find your “zen,’’ your spiritual animal. Life in the “real world’’ now is almost impossible, because the park so slows down reality, and makes you see animals, lakes, rivers, mountains and people so differently. All I have to do is step outside my door, and feel nature as John Muir saw it.

As the concierge as the Lake Hotel, I have a daily opportunity to inspire guests to engage the park on its most basic level. I encourage guests to get off the beaten path, to rise early and stay up late, to avoid crowds and best enjoy the animals and scenery. I try to direct them to special areas, like the Lake Butte Overlook, where they can enjoy the sun setting over the largest lake at this elevation in North America. I want the public to leave Yellowstone with a grander understanding of the park’s grandeur, and our sheer luck at having it as part of our country and culture.

I want each and every guest to have the best experience in the park as possible. I therefore take the time to map out each and every day they are in the park, trying to avoid overlap. I also try to encourage them to learn history, so the park has a deeper meaning. It is my sincere hope that they leave Yellowstone with a deeper appreciation of America’s first national park, and of the national parks and monuments in their own states.

Her inspirations…
Author Caroline McClure’s world has been rocked by rocks ever since she was a young girl. Living and working in Yellowstone National Park for more than a dozen years allowed her to explore the fascinating world at her feet. You may see what she sees in these rocks, or you may see something entirely different. The lesson is to notice and protect them. All the Yellowstone treasures featured in this book were photographed (and remain) in the park, safe in their natural settings to capture the imaginations of fellow rock lovers, for future generations.

I love to create……. I have an addiction for anything that can be fixed, painted or repurposed into something beautiful to enjoy. Im that person snatching up what others are throwing away. The best things in life are free! My dad would tell you that I don’t like it unless its falling apart.

I try to incorporate these things in my art; recycling scrap metal to make metal and clay garden sculptures, using scraps of paper to collage a background for my paintings, or finding that “treasure” in the dumpster to use as a display shelf for a show.

I grew up on a farm near the river in Eastern Montana where I spent countless hours outside….. playing in the mud, hunting for “beautiful” rocks, loving on animals and a lot of wandering around.

 

Her inspirations…

Author Caroline McClure’s world has been rocked by rocks ever since she was a young girl. Living and working in Yellowstone National Park for more than a dozen years allowed her to explore the fascinating world at her feet. You may see what she sees in these rocks, or you may see something entirely different. The lesson is to notice and protect them. All the Yellowstone treasures featured in this book were photographed (and remain) in the park, safe in their natural settings to capture the imaginations of fellow rock lovers, for future generations.

Her Story and Inspirations…

Contemporary Native American Artist DG House of Bozeman, MT has had her work exhibited in the finest art museums including the Yellowstone Art Museum and the CM Russell Museum in Montana as well the Heard Museum in Phoenix, AZ, and the Eiteljorg Museum of Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis, IN. Her work is in permanent collections worldwide including rock stars Sir Elton John, Sir Paul McCartney, Michael McDonald, and the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC.

When asked about Yellowstone’s inspiration on her and her work, DG says, “Be careful, it can change you. Yellowstone completely inspires everything I do, including moving halfway across the country to be there.” It inspired her choice of career, first becoming a photographer and then a painter.

As DG explains it, Yellowstone is, “The essence of everything I do. Every painting I create is based on a story, a real story that happened in Yellowstone Park at some point.”

DG wants her work to, “give voice to the people and wildlife of Yellowstone that don’t have a voice in this culture” and “remind the viewer of what they felt when they were in the park.”

Her inspirations…

Author Caroline McClure’s world has been rocked by rocks ever since she was a young girl. Living and
working in Yellowstone National Park for more than a dozen years allowed her to explore the fascinating
world at her feet. You may see what she sees in these rocks, or you may see something entirely different.
The lesson is to notice and protect them. All the Yellowstone treasures featured in this book were
photographed (and remain) in the park, safe in their natural settings to capture the imaginations of fellow
rock lovers, for future generations.

Artist John Potter was raised in the Upper Great Lakes country – on and off the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe Indian Reservation in northern Wisconsin – where he grew up with an abiding love for the Natural World in the forests of the Great Northwoods.

He often paints en plein air, bringing his small outdoor studies home, where they are then used as reference to create his larger studio works. Working directly from Nature, he firmly believes in the all-pervading Divinity found in the Natural World, and is always striving for an honest expression of light and color. John spends many hours in the field, observing and studying light, mood, atmosphere, the land and sky. He carries paints and a sketchbook whenever possible, travelling extensively – but his favorite subjects remain the rugged mountain scenery of the American West.

Her inspirations…

While photography has always been a favorite hobby of mine, it was not until I cam ‘out west’ that the subject matter really began to grab my attention. I have had the wonderful opportunity of living and working in Yellowstone National Park since 2000, guiding and leading photography tours from 2005 to present, which has allowed me to develop and pursue my passion for nature photography. Working seasonally and traveling all over the world has given me lots of opportunities to practice my skills as a naturalist and photographer, while forming a deeper bond with our amazing natural world. From chasing my dreams of working in Alaska to finally indulging on an African safari, my camera and love of nature photography has provided countless opportunities for me.

My inspirations…

“Thermal Puddles” are a decorative kiln glass series that are inspired by the thermal pools found in Yellowstone National Park. I am fascinated by the geology of “The Park”. Looking deep, down into the earth the rings of bold color get hotter as the color changes. Microorganisms live in the shallow water which help create the amazing color along with the presence of different minerals exposed to the heat from the earth.

A reaction occurs when fusing sulfur and copper-bearing glass with silver foil. The reaction is very much like what happens in the park with the same minerals and extreme heat present. Rings of bold color form and no two are exactly alike.

Modern Relics Thermal Puddles are the thermal pools you can touch. The bowls are tactile and present; they represent the change brought on by the processes that occur at the core of the park, the caldera. They are a physical example of the science that occurs in Yellowstone National Park and a beautiful addition to any home that will bring back memories of such an amazing place.

While visiting with guests about my glass artwork, my hopes are that they learn a little more about the geology of the thermal pools. The same minerals are present in the many colors of glass and when exposed to heat from the kiln they change. Much like what happens naturally over thousands of years. I have recreated a little science that they can take home. A thermal pool they can touch.

My inspirations…

Yellowstone inspires me in many ways. The variety and unique characteristics of Yellowstone remind me that God uses His artistry to create a beautiful place! The majestic landscapes, the thermal features, the vast array of animals and visitors from all over the world all add meaning to Yellowstone for me personally.

I have always loved painting animals so my time spent in Yellowstone has expanded my portfolio to include many different animals who inhabit The Park. I have painted bison, elk, wolves, eagles, and bear in my paintings–all inspired from being a featured artist in Yellowstone.

People take memories with them when they leave Yellowstone. A goal of mine is to create a lasting impression on what they remember from visiting Yellowstone. If I can be a part of that process, I have fulfilled my goal. Each time I experience this gorgeous national park, I am inspired in new and differing ways. Transferring this inspiration to canvass or paper is my God-given talent and it is a privilege to share this with others.

My inspirations…

Yellowstone inspires me in many ways. The variety and unique characteristics of Yellowstone remind me that God uses His artistry to create a beautiful place! The majestic landscapes, the thermal features, the vast array of animals and visitors from all over the world all add meaning to Yellowstone for me personally.

I have always loved painting animals so my time spent in Yellowstone has expanded my portfolio to include many different animals who inhabit The Park. I have painted bison, elk, wolves, eagles, and bear in my paintings–all inspired from being a featured artist in Yellowstone.

People take memories with them when they leave Yellowstone. A goal of mine is to create a lasting impression on what they remember from visiting Yellowstone. If I can be a part of that process, I have fulfilled my goal. Each time I experience this gorgeous national park, I am inspired in new and differing ways. Transferring this inspiration to canvass or paper is my God-given talent and it is a privilege to share this with others.

My inspirations…

“Thermal Puddles” are a decorative kiln glass series that are inspired by the thermal pools found in Yellowstone National Park. I am fascinated by the geology of “The Park”. Looking deep, down into the earth the rings of bold color get hotter as the color changes. Microorganisms live in the shallow water which help create the amazing color along with the presence of different minerals exposed to the heat from the earth.

A reaction occurs when fusing sulfur and copper-bearing glass with silver foil. The reaction is very much like what happens in the park with the same minerals and extreme heat present. Rings of bold color form and no two are exactly alike.

Modern Relics Thermal Puddles are the thermal pools you can touch. The bowls are tactile and present; they represent the change brought on by the processes that occur at the core of the park, the caldera. They are a physical example of the science that occurs in Yellowstone National Park and a beautiful addition to any home that will bring back memories of such an amazing place.

While visiting with guests about my glass artwork, my hopes are that they learn a little more about the geology of the thermal pools. The same minerals are present in the many colors of glass and when exposed to heat from the kiln they change. Much like what happens naturally over thousands of years. I have recreated a little science that they can take home. A thermal pool they can touch.

My inspirations…

Yellowstone inspires me in many ways. The variety and unique characteristics of Yellowstone remind me that God uses His artistry to create a beautiful place! The majestic landscapes, the thermal features, the vast array of animals and visitors from all over the world all add meaning to Yellowstone for me personally.

I have always loved painting animals so my time spent in Yellowstone has expanded my portfolio to include many different animals who inhabit The Park. I have painted bison, elk, wolves, eagles, and bear in my paintings–all inspired from being a featured artist in Yellowstone.

People take memories with them when they leave Yellowstone. A goal of mine is to create a lasting impression on what they remember from visiting Yellowstone. If I can be a part of that process, I have fulfilled my goal. Each time I experience this gorgeous national park, I am inspired in new and differing ways. Transferring this inspiration to canvass or paper is my God-given talent and it is a privilege to share this with others.

My inspirations…

“Thermal Puddles” are a decorative kiln glass series that are inspired by the thermal pools found in Yellowstone National Park. I am fascinated by the geology of “The Park”. Looking deep, down into the earth the rings of bold color get hotter as the color changes. Microorganisms live in the shallow water which help create the amazing color along with the presence of different minerals exposed to the heat from the earth.

A reaction occurs when fusing sulfur and copper-bearing glass with silver foil. The reaction is very much like what happens in the park with the same minerals and extreme heat present. Rings of bold color form and no two are exactly alike.

Modern Relics Thermal Puddles are the thermal pools you can touch. The bowls are tactile and present; they represent the change brought on by the processes that occur at the core of the park, the caldera. They are a physical example of the science that occurs in Yellowstone National Park and a beautiful addition to any home that will bring back memories of such an amazing place.

While visiting with guests about my glass artwork, my hopes are that they learn a little more about the geology of the thermal pools. The same minerals are present in the many colors of glass and when exposed to heat from the kiln they change. Much like what happens naturally over thousands of years. I have recreated a little science that they can take home. A thermal pool they can touch.

Her inspirations…
Author Caroline McClure’s world has been rocked by rocks ever since she was a young girl. Living and
working in Yellowstone National Park for more than a dozen years allowed her to explore the fascinating
world at her feet. You may see what she sees in these rocks, or you may see something entirely different.
The lesson is to notice and protect them. All the Yellowstone treasures featured in this book were
photographed (and remain) in the park, safe in their natural settings to capture the imaginations of fellow
rock lovers, for future generations.

Her Story and Inspirations…

Contemporary Native American Artist DG House of Bozeman, MT has had her work exhibited in the finest art museums including the Yellowstone Art Museum and the CM Russell Museum in Montana as well the Heard Museum in Phoenix, AZ, and the Eiteljorg Museum of Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis, IN. Her work is in permanent collections worldwide including rock stars Sir Elton John, Sir Paul McCartney, Michael McDonald, and the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC.

When asked about Yellowstone’s inspiration on her and her work, DG says, “Be careful, it can change you. Yellowstone completely inspires everything I do, including moving halfway across the country to be there.” It inspired her choice of career, first becoming a photographer and then a painter.

As DG explains it, Yellowstone is, “The essence of everything I do. Every painting I create is based on a story, a real story that happened in Yellowstone Park at some point.”

DG wants her work to, “give voice to the people and wildlife of Yellowstone that don’t have a voice in this culture” and “remind the viewer of what they felt when they were in the park.”

Her inspirations…

While photography has always been a favorite hobby of mine, it was not until I cam ‘out west’ that the subject matter really began to grab my attention.  I have had the wonderful opportunity of living and working in Yellowstone National Park since 2000, guiding and leading photography tours from 2005 to present, which has allowed me to develop and pursue my passion for nature photography. Working seasonally and traveling all over the world has given me lots of opportunities to practice my skills as a naturalist and photographer, while forming a deeper bond with our amazing natural world. From chasing my dreams of working in Alaska to finally indulging on an African safari, my camera and love of nature photography has provided countless opportunities for me.